Case Conferencing Insights for Successful Advocacy

Case Conferencing Insights: Details, Not Just Law, Can Sway Police Decisions

Understanding the nuances of case conferencing goes beyond legal arguments alone. Details, context, and even presentation style can significantly impact outcomes.

Case Study: A client faced common assault charge from a domestic situation. While prepared with legal arguments and relevant case law, it was the comprehensive factual background, including details about the complainant’s substance abuse and gambling issues, that resonated with the police, and caused them to doubt the complainant’s evidence.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Beyond Legal Arguments: While legal knowledge is crucial, do not underestimate the power of detailed background information like chronology, history, and past behavior. These paint a clearer picture and provide context for legal arguments.
  2. Not All Police Are Prosecutors: Remember, Police at case conferences may not all be legally trained. Tailor your approach to focus on presenting facts in an understandable way. Avoid complex legal jargon and focus on clear, concise explanations.
  3. Presentation Matters: Consider alternative methods to convey information. In this case, printing out text messages depicting the children’s fear provided impactful evidence beyond just affidavits.
  4. Build Trust: Demonstrating a comprehensive understanding of the situation and presenting evidence effectively helps build trust with the police, influencing their decisions.

Facing a complex legal issue?

Family Law conflict can easily spill over to conflict with the police. Contact the experienced solicitors at Madsen Law for a confidential consultation. We understand the intricacies of case conferencing and how to effectively present your case, beyond just legal arguments. Let us advocate for you and achieve the best possible outcome.

Disclaimer: This information is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. For specific legal needs, please consult with a qualified lawyer.

Latest Posts

Law Categories

Changes to the Family Law Act: Implications for Fathers

There will be significant changes to how parenting orders are made when the Family Law Act amendment comes into effect on the 6th of May 2024. Read the article to find out more and how this may affect you.
Two of the more significant changes are how the court determines what is in a Child’s Best Interest and the repeal of the Presumption of Shared Parental Responsibility.

Read More →
Family Law

THE INDEPENDENT CHILDREN’S LAWYER IS TERRIBLE – SO HOW DO I GET THEM REPLACED?

In the recent case of Stanhope v Stanhope (2023), the Family Court of Western Australia faced a critical decision regarding the father’s plea for the removal of the Independent Children’s Lawyer (ICL). Allegations included the ICL’s perceived lack of impartiality, professionalism, and capability to serve the child’s best interests. The court, however, emphasized the ICL’s unique role, outlining that removal should only occur for substantial reasons, such as deliberate misinformation, unethical behavior, bias, incompetence, or a conflict of interest.

Read More →
Estate Law

How To Contest A Will?

Challenging the will is a complex legal process that does require the assistance from an experienced estate lawyer.

Read More →
Law Categories

Changes to the Family Law Act: Implications for Fathers

There will be significant changes to how parenting orders are made when the Family Law Act amendment comes into effect on the 6th of May 2024. Read the article to find out more and how this may affect you.
Two of the more significant changes are how the court determines what is in a Child’s Best Interest and the repeal of the Presumption of Shared Parental Responsibility.

Read More →
Family Law

THE INDEPENDENT CHILDREN’S LAWYER IS TERRIBLE – SO HOW DO I GET THEM REPLACED?

In the recent case of Stanhope v Stanhope (2023), the Family Court of Western Australia faced a critical decision regarding the father’s plea for the removal of the Independent Children’s Lawyer (ICL). Allegations included the ICL’s perceived lack of impartiality, professionalism, and capability to serve the child’s best interests. The court, however, emphasized the ICL’s unique role, outlining that removal should only occur for substantial reasons, such as deliberate misinformation, unethical behavior, bias, incompetence, or a conflict of interest.

Read More →